Fake prophets under fire

Alph Lukau

A group of youthful bogus prophets has come under fire for masquerading as men of God while reaping off unsuspecting congregants.

The fake pastors allegedly stage manage prophecies and fake miracles as a stunt to attract people to their churches.

One such preacher is South African based self-styled prophet, Alph Lukau, who caused a stir after a video in which he was claiming that Vice President Dr Constantino Chiwenga was going to face complicated health problems went viral on social media.

The VP returned home a few days later in his usual chatty and jovial self.

VP Chiwenga went on to host a church gathering at his Hwedza home last weekend and told the bogus prophets to stop the unbecoming behaviour.

The Zanu PF youth league has also come out guns blazing against preachers such as Lukau. Prophet Lukau, a Congolese national who runs Alleluia Ministries International in South Africa, allegedly made the prophecy to attract attention and boost numbers at his church.

Allegations for stage managed prophecies and miracles have been made against Prophet Lukau.

In 2011, an unemployed South African woman, Trish Hosia of Berea, took Lukau to court after he made her pay R120 000 of her savings as first fruits, promising her a hundred–fold blessing in return.

Nothing materialised and Hosia got frustrated by the fake promise. She demanded her dues back but Prophet Lukau would not budge. He allegedly hired thugs to harass Hosia.

Prophet Lukau was not available for comment last week. On the local scene, Talent Muzuva was described by VP Chiwenga as a fake prophet who is bent on criticising his elders using God’s name.

Muzuva has made a number of false prophecies regarding several local leaders.

VP Chiwenga was quoted in our sister paper, The Herald, as saying: “There are others who are now calling themselves prophets,” said VP Chiwenga. “Aripo uyo anonzi ani, (there is someone called) Talent (Muzuva).

“That should come to an end today. Zvatoperera pano (It stops now). We don’t have that culture where one moves around attacking leaders under the guise of preaching the word of God. God does not say move around attacking other people.”

Media, Information and Broadcasting Services Deputy Minister Energy Mutodi recently said while Government respects the right to freedom of expression as enshrined in Section 61 of the Constitution, individuals should also respect other people’s rights.

“There is freedom of worship and freedom of association. However, one needs not infringe into other people’s rights and liberties when exercising his or her own right,” the deputy minister was quoted in a local daily. If you are preaching to your church and you are a pastor or religious leader, you certainly do not want to call names of political leaders and denigrate them as if you were a leader of a rival political party. That is wrong.”

The Constitution clearly spells out that every Zimbabwean has inherent dignity in their private or public life, and the right to have that dignity respected and protected.

In Section 57 (e), the Constitution gives citizens the right to privacy and forbids anyone from disclosing another person’s health condition.