U.S. Insists On “Meaningful Change In Zimbabwe”

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa and US President Donald Trum

Charge d’ Affaires at the United States Embassy in Zimbabwe, Jennifer Savage has said that her country wants to see meaningful change in Zimbabwe which will result in trade and investment between the two countries.

She said that meaningful change would also allow American companies to thrive in Zimbabwe, and Zimbabwean companies to thrive in the United States. Speaking at the Commemoration of the 242nd independence of the United States of America (Fourth of July) last week, Savage said,

Zimbabwe – you have warmly welcomed elections observers and the media. History, and the world, have their eyes on you. This is your chance to show your commitment to democratic principles. At the conclusion of this last song, the playwright puts profound words into the mouth of George Washington who tells Hamilton: “Winning is easy, governing is harder.” And the government is doing the hard work. There is greater space for democratic discourse today than there has been in decades.

Whatever government takes leadership after July 30 must make progress on the ideals that the people of Zimbabwe demand, and free, fair, and credible elections is just one of those demands. Of utmost importance are human rights reforms – to include reconciliation and accounting for past sins, a meaningful restoration of property rights, and the repeal of oppressive laws.

This goes hand in hand with good governance and harmonizing the laws of the nation with the 2013 constitution. Finally, Zimbabweans look forward to the economic reforms that will usher into reality the ‘open for business’ sign, including a more efficient bureaucracy and a plan to address the liquidity crisis.

As I draw to a close, what do we want Zimbabwean-American relations to look like in the future? We must look beyond targeted sanctions to envision a relationship in which trade and investment flow freely between our two nations.

In which American companies thrive in Zimbabwe, and Zimbabwean companies thrive in the United States. In which Zimbabwean and American academics work together to resolve the health and environmental challenges of the day. To our militaries working side by side in humanitarian demining operations and in maintaining peace and security.

All of this is contingent upon meaningful change in Zimbabwe. Winning is easy, governing is harder. We will be so proud to see Zimbabwe join us as a model of democratic principles. Just like my country, you are young scrappy and hungry and you are not throwing away your shot!

More: US Embassy In Zimbabwe