3 recipes that will change your mind about goat meat

In South Africa, goat meat is usually reserved for special rituals and prayers, and then boiled and eaten with a starch of choice, mostly dombolo or pap. But there’s more to it than that. Picture: Chris Collingridge

Goat meat or more properly, chevon, is one of those meats that most people are wary to try. I’ve only had it once and didn’t enjoy it. But as I haven’t learnt, it’s not the meat – it’s how it’s prepared.

It’s like steak. Your level of enjoyment depends on how it’s prepared. If you are a person who loves steak well done, you definitely won’t enjoy it if it’s medium rare. The same with chevon.

Adult goat meat is called chevon, while capretto is meat from young goats (kids).

In South Africa, goat meat is usually reserved for special rituals and prayers, and then boiled and eaten with a starch of choice, mostly dombolo or pap. But there’s more to it than that.

I think the Algerians and Moroccans got it right. Their tagines are popular, even getting those who haven’t enjoyed goat meat before to change their minds about it.

The recipes we have here will allow you to experience the best parts of chevon. From the pulled shoulder and tagine, to the chops, it’s three meals your family will heartily tuck into.

Spicy fried goat chops (Serves 4-6)

Spicy fried goat chops. Picture: Chris Collingridge

Ingredients

olive oil (for frying)

12 goat chops

250ml chopped celery

2 red onions, sliced into wedges

10ml chopped garlic

5ml cumin seeds

5ml coriander seeds

1 red chilli (seeded and chopped)

400g tinned chopped tomatoes

500ml chicken stock

125ml orange juice

maize fritters or rice (for serving)

Method

Heat the oil in a pan and fry the chops until nicely browned.

Place them in an ovenproof dish.

To the pan add the celery, onion and garlic. Fry until soft.

Add the seeds and chilli and fry for a minute.

Add the tomatoes, stock, orange juice and seasoning and bring to the boil.

Pour over the chops and bake in the oven at 180°C for 40-50 minutes until tender.

Serve with maize fritters or rice

Slow-roasted pulled goat shoulder (Serves 4)

This simple offering of goat shoulder marinated in aromatic spices is definitely worth a try. Picture: Chris Collingridge

6 cloves of garlic, chopped

10ml salt

10ml za’atar spice

10ml sumac spice

60ml olive oil

10ml grated lemon rind

45ml lemon juice

1.5kg goat shoulder

750ml chicken stock

roti (for serving)

Method

Put the garlic and salt in a pestle and mortar and pound until smooth.

Mix in the spices, oil, lemon rind and juice.

Mix well.

Rub this mixture into the meat.

Place in a roasting tin.

Add the stock, cover tightly with foil and roast at 160°C for 3-4 hours or until the meat is falling off the bone.

Remove the meat and when cool enough to handle, shred it finely.

Put the juices from the pan into a pot and boil until reduced and thickened.

Add to the shredded meat.

Serve with roti.

Goat Tagine (Serves 4-6)

Nothing says home-cooked quite like a delicious meaty stew. Picture: Chris Collingridge

Ingredients

30ml olive oil

1kg goat stewing meat

2 large onions, chopped

10ml garlic, chopped

15ml grated ginger

10ml ground cumin

10ml ground coriander

10ml paprika

5ml harrisa ground spice

10ml salt

black pepper

400g tin of chopped tomatoes

500ml lamb or chicken stock

125g dried apricots

50g whole almonds

125ml chopped coriander

pap (for serving)

Method

Heat the oil in a pot and fry the meat in batches until browned.

Remove and set aside.

Add the onion, garlic and ginger and simmer until soft.

Add the spices and fry until fragrant.

Return the meat to the pot and add the tomatoes and stock and simmer covered until the meat is soft (1-2 hours).

Remove the lid and add the apricots and almonds and simmer until the sauce has reduced and thickened.

Stir in the coriander and serve with pap, couscous or rice.